Creative Hopelessness for Burnout

Jessica-Borushok

Key Points

  1. When working with clients experiencing burnout, it is important to first explore how their current behavior and approach is not working.
  2. Increasing awareness of the client’s experience and behavior patterns involves reframing them through defusion language and creative hopelessness.
  3. Before working on committed action and behavioral change, the client needs to develop skills and awareness so they can handle the internal experiences that will arise as a result.
lock-icon

To unlock this video you need to become a Therapy Pro: Plus member.

Earn 1.25 CE Credits

Working on Not Working

What do you do if you’re working with a client who’s experiencing burnout; who feels hopeless, exhausted, and overwhelmed; who’s imagining running off to an island somewhere and escaping from their life? You help them to understand that what they’re currently doing isn’t working. Now, this might seem obvious, or we might assume they already know this, which is why they’re coming to therapy.

That may be true on some level. There may be a rational part of the client’s mind that’s saying they need to fix things because they aren’t working. There’s a difference between ”This feeling isn’t working” and “This way of approaching my experience isn’t working”. The ACT focus is on the latter: what they feel is a reflection of behavior not working.

Unlock ACTing Against Burnout: The Case of Jack course.

Become a Therapy Pro: Plus Member.

Learn more

Already have an account? Sign in

Download These Materials

Unlock ACTing Against Burnout: The Case of Jack course.

Become a Therapy Pro: Plus Member.

Learn more

Already have an account? Sign in